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C Katt Krespach, NTPis a nutritional therapy practitioner and long time activist with a passion for the healing arts and social entrepreneurship. She is an author, public speaker, and entrepreneur. Follow Katt on Facebook, WordPress, Twitter, and Instagram.
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For 12 days, activisits mobilized using social media … to undertake the largest world-wide protest ever organized.


May 3 – 15, 2016: On six continents, thousands of people took bold action to Break Free of fossil fuels and stand together in solidarity against coporations who are destroying the ecosystems of earth.  This is their story…

Using Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites, thousands of protestors gathered in cities around the world to stand in solidarity against some of the most earth-shattering and destructive corporations that are destroying the ecosystems of earth.

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Break Free protest in Vancouver, Canada. Photo credit: Zack Embree / Survival Media Agency, ecowatch

“Twelve days of unprecedented worldwide action against fossil fuels concluded Sunday showing that the climate movement will not rest until all coal, oil and gas is kept in the ground. The combined global efforts of activists on six continents now pose a serious threat to the future of the fossil fuel industry, already weakened by financial and political uncertainty.” – source

Several thousand activists took to the streets, occupied mines, blocked rail lines, linked arms, paddled in canoes and held community conferences in thirteen nations, pushing the limits of traditional protest to find new methods to demand coal, gas and oil stay in the ground.

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The UK’s largest opencast coal mine was shut down for a day. Photo credit: Tim Wagner, ecowatch

“People power in our cities, in our villages and on the front lines of climate change have brought us to a point where we have a global climate deal, but we do not stop now, we need more action and faster,” Wael Hmaidan, director of Climate Action Network, said. “Civil society is set to rise up again, to fight for our societies to break free from fossil fuels, to propel them even faster towards a just future powered by 100 percent renewable energy.” – source

This global action was created by Break Free, a organization focused on our need to shift away from existing dependence on ordinary fuels to a world energy system powered by 100% replenishable energy.

Break Free, 2016: the movement steps up. Watch this video to see what Break Free is all about… 

“Unwavering resistance. Fierce solidarity. Courage by the gigaton.” – Break Free 

This is what it looks like when the movement grows in courage, strength and beauty.

 Targeting World’s Most Dangerous Fossil Fuel Projects

Driving this unparalleled wave of demonstrations is the unexpected and dramatic acceleration in the warming of the planet.

“This is the hottest year we’ve ever measured, and so it is remarkably comforting to see people rising up at every point of the compass to insist on change,” Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350.org, said.

Some highlights from the Break Free 2016 global event…

Read every account of all 2016 protests mobilized by Break Free here 

May 3, French activists blockade offshore oil drilling summit – Pau, France

May 14th, Activists in Albany, New York, protest against fossil fuel extraction and the transport of crude oil by rail in what are often called “bomb trains.”

On May 15th, 21 activists from across California blocked the entrance to the natural gas storage facility in Porter Ranch, outside of LA.

On the final day of mobilization, a key monitoring site on Tasmania recorded atmospheric carbon-dioxide surpassing four hundred parts per million for the 1st time ever.

“This is the latest year we’ve ever measured, and so it is surprisingly a comfort to see folk climbing up at each point of the compass to insist strongly upon change,” Bill McKibben, co-founder of 360.org. 

Get involved …  discover more about  the Break Free movement here

 

source – ecowatch

cover photo – 350.org