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C Katt Krespach

C Katt Krespach, NTPis a nutritional therapy practitioner and long time activist with a passion for the healing arts and social entrepreneurship. She is an author, public speaker, and entrepreneur. Follow Katt on Facebook, WordPress, Twitter, and Instagram.
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A 17 year old girl once told me, “I love the psychiatrist the state gave me… I never want to leave her.  She totally get’s me, and when I’m feeling sad… gives me a prescription of adderall. It’s basically meth, but from the doctor.”  I had never heard of the Adderall-meth connection, but this girl taught me a lot about why meth is on the rise – and how Adderall started it all.


“Anyone who’s ever been given one of their friend’s Adderall knows the powerful effects brought on by this tiny unintimidating pink pill. Increased energy, enhanced ability to focus and concentrate, and a euphoric sense of being are the most common effects of this drug.”

According to Matt Agorist, and The Free Thought Project:

The use of methamphetamine in the United States is actually on the decline according to U.S. National Drug Control Policy Director R. Gil Kerlikowske. However, there are over 3.5 million American children currently take an ADHD drug, a nearly 500% increase since 1990.

It seems that the pharmaceutical industry has figured out a way to market ADHD to the masses in an attempt to sell them their legal version of meth.

Meth has the same effect as Adderall… why?  Because the drugs have nearly the same chemical structure.

 

meth-adderall

Dr. Carl Hart is a professor of psychology and psychiatry at Columbia University. Hart is known for his research into drug abuse and drug addiction. Hart was also the first tenured African American professor of sciences at Columbia University. He received a bachelor of science and a master of science from the University of Maryland and he received his Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Wyoming. By all accounts, he is the expert in the field of drug use.

The only major difference between crystal meth and Adderall is public perception.

Hart explains that this perception of illicit meth is largely due to misinformation put out by public service messages. In a recent article on his website theinfluence.org, Hart explains

“…The public remains almost entirely ignorant of the fact that methamphetamine produces nearly identical effects to those produced by the popular ADHD medication d-amphetamine (dextroamphetamine). You probably know it as Adderall®: a combination of amphetamine and d-amphetamine mixed salts.”

Hart admitted that he too believed that methamphetamine was far more dangerous than d-amphetamine, despite the fact that the chemical structure of the two drugs is nearly identical.

However, after thoroughly researching the evidence, Hart shattered this belief.

To back up his claims, Hart and his team conducted a study…

During the double-blind study, 13 men who regularly use methamphetamine, were given a hit of methamphetamine (meth), of d-amphetamine (adderall), or a placebo.

According to the study:

And when offered an opportunity to choose either the drugs or varying amounts of money, our subjects chose to take d-amphetamine on a similar number of occasions as they chose to take methamphetamine.

These regular methamphetamine users could not distinguish between the two. (It is possible that the methyl group enhances methamphetamine’s lipid-solubility, but this effect appears to be imperceptible to human consumers.)

It is also true that the effects of smoking methamphetamine are more intense than those of swallowing a pill containing d-amphetamine. But that increased intensity is due to the route of administration, not the drug itself.

Smoking d-amphetamine produces nearly identical intense effects as smoking methamphetamine. The same would be true if the drugs were snorted intranasally.

The significance of Hart’s study has a paradigm-shattering effect. On one hand, it shows that a drug, which is legally taken by millions of children in the US, is identical to an illegal substance associated with a slew of negative traits.

Meth users are not much different from the millions of Americans who take its legal counterpart, Adderall

As Dr. Hart so eloquently says,

“It took me nearly 20 years and dozens of scientific publications in the area of drug use to recognize my own biases around methamphetamine. I can only hope that you don’t require as much time and scientific activity in order to understand that the Adderall that you or your loved one takes each day is essentially the same drug as meth.

And I hope that this knowledge engenders less judgment of people who use meth, and greater empathy.”

Original Article written by Matt Agorist

, The Free Thought Project

source – the mind unleashed.com

cover photo – the mind unleashed.com